Quick Answer: How Can God Be Omniscient And Allow Free Will?

Is God all knowing paradox?

Omnipotence is only one of the attributes of God which has been thought to lead to paradox; another is omniscience.

Omniscience seems, at first glance, easy to define: for a being to be omniscient is for that being to know all the truths..

What is an example of free will?

Free will is the idea that we are able to have some choice in how we act and assumes that we are free to choose our behavior, in other words we are self determined. For example, people can make a free choice as to whether to commit a crime or not (unless they are a child or they are insane).

What do you think about divine omniscience?

Omniscience is an attribute having to do with knowledge; it is the attribute of “having knowledge of everything.” Many philosophers consider omniscience to be an attribute possessed only by a divine being, such as the God of Western monotheism.

Does God control everything?

The Bible teaches that God’s sovereignty is an essential aspect of who he is, that he has supreme authority and absolute power over all things. And yes he is very much active, despite our perplexity. Scripture says, God works “all things according to the counsel of his will” (Ephesians 1:11).

Are all sins equal to God?

All Sin is not the Same While God does see sin differently we now have Jesus to forgive us of our sin. “But when Christ had offered for all time a single sacrifice for sins, he sat down at the right hand of God” (Hebrews 10:12 ESV).

Are omniscience and free will compatible?

The argument from free will, also called the paradox of free will or theological fatalism, contends that omniscience and free will are incompatible and that any conception of God that incorporates both properties is therefore inconceivable.

What is human free will?

Free will, in humans, the power or capacity to choose among alternatives or to act in certain situations independently of natural, social, or divine restraints. … A prominent feature of existentialism is the concept of a radical, perpetual, and frequently agonizing freedom of choice.

Why does God give us free will if he knows everything?

God is omniscient and His knowledge is timeless—that is, God knows timelessly all that has happened, is happening, and will happen. Therefore, if He knows timelessly that a person will perform such-and-such an action, then it is impossible for that person not to perform that action.

Do you believe in free will?

Free will is generally understood as the ability to freely choose our own actions and determine our own outcomes. … While those are simple examples, if you believe in free will, you believe there are a limitless number of actions you can engage in when you wake up in the morning, and they are all within your control.

What does God say about free will?

Free will is granted to every man. If he desires to incline towards the good way and be righteous, he has the power to do so; and if he desires to incline towards the unrighteous way and be a wicked man, he also has the power to do so.

What is the problem of God’s foreknowledge?

The problem of freedom and foreknowledge is the problem of reconciling our freedom to act with the claim that God knows how we will act prior to our acting. If God knows how I will act before I will, it appears that I must act in the way God predicts and therefore lack the freedom to do otherwise.

Is there free will in fatalism?

Theological fatalism is the thesis that infallible foreknowledge of a human act makes the act necessary and hence unfree. … If there is a being who knows the entire future infallibly, then no human act is free.

What is the problem of free will?

The notion that all propositions, whether about the past, present or future, are either true or false. The problem of free will, in this context, is the problem of how choices can be free, given that what one does in the future is already determined as true or false in the present. Theological determinism.

Is Divine foreknowledge compatible with free will?

But one might, of course, also simply accept Edwards’ argument, and say that divine foreknowledge and free will are incompatible.

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